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Suicide is a topic that many of us find difficult to discuss. Attempts on one’s own life, particularly if unsuccessful, are not commonly spoken about, let alone raised in personal injury proceedings. However, can a defendant raise that a claimant should be contributorily negligent for an unsuccessful suicide attempt? This issue was briefly explored by Mrs Justice Whipple


In this inaugural briefing for our Public Law Group, Saleem Khalid and Richard Collier take a detailed look at some of the key cases of the last twelve months affecting public authority liability. The Supreme Court’s judgment in the case of CN v Poole is (surely!) due shortly, whilst permission to appeal to the Supreme


QOCS, otherwise known as Qualified One-way Costs Shifting, leaves defendants out of pocket when defending claims, unless a defendant can satisfy one of the few exceptions in the Civil Procedure Rules to merit its disapplication. In particular, CPR 44.15 provides several exceptions where permission of the Court is not required to to enforce a costs


Suppose you are under a professional obligation to do an act by no later than the end of 2 June, in default of which your client will suffer immediate loss. You can comply with your obligation by doing the act in question (for example, online) at any time up until midnight on that date. If,


Medical reports are often meticulously scrutinised in personal injury claims. They provide an overview of the claimant’s personal account to his or her expert of their symptomatology, past medical history and the circumstances of their accident. Sometimes, a claimant may suggest that their report does not quite accord with the symptoms they say are ongoing.


The Lord Chancellor will announce later today that the first review of the personal injury discount rate under the Damages Act 1996 as amended by the Civil Liability Act 2018 will start on 19 March 2019. The Act requires that the Lord Chancellor must conduct the review and determine whether the rate should be changed


Word of warning for McKenzie Friends & Co

I have seen this decision reported in a number of places online and it seems to be both important and interesting, so thought I’d add something brief here. The High Court has given much needed guidance on the duty of care owed by unqualified advisers such as McKenzie Friends. In essence they are judged by


Medical reports are often meticulously scrutinised in personal injury claims. They provide an overview of the claimant’s personal account to his or her expert of their symptomatology, past medical history and the circumstances of their accident. Sometimes, a claimant may suggest that their report does not quite accord with the symptoms they say are ongoing. Should medical experts


The High Court has recently considered the circumstances in which it is appropriate to grant anonymity orders under CPR 39.2(4) and the stage at which such applications should be made. In Justyna Zeromska-Smith v United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust [2019] EWHC 552 (QB) the Claimant brought proceedings against the Defendant NHS Trust for psychiatric injury allegedly caused


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